Magazine or Newspaper

Dissent at the War Memorial

Article by Howard Zinn. The Progressive. August 2004.
"As I write this, the sounds of the World War II Memorial celebration in Washington, D.C., are still in my head. I was invited by the Smithsonian Institution to be on one of the panels, and the person who called to invite me said that the theme would be 'War Stories.' I told him that I would come, but not to tell 'war stories,' rather to talk about World War II and its meaning for us today."

Dissent In Pursuit Of Equality, Life, Liberty And Happiness

Howard Zinn interviewed by Sharon Basco. Tompaine.com. July 3, 2002.
"When you say the country was founded by people who believed in dissent, well, they believed in their own right to dissent in the relationship with England. But it happens very often that people who believe in their own right to dissent, when they gain power they don't really accept the idea that other people have the right to dissent."

Distilled Zinn

By the editors. The Progressive. March 2010.
"Howard Zinn wrote a column for The Progressive during the last twelve years of his life. In the March 2010 issue, the editors collected his wisdom from those columns. Here are a few bits."

Don’t Despair About the Supreme Court

Article by Howard Zinn. The Progressive. November 2005.
"John Roberts sailed through his confirmation hearings as the new Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, with enthusiastic Republican support, and a few weak mutterings of opposition by the Democrats. Then, after the far right deemed Harriet Miers insufficiently doctrinaire, Bush nominated arch conservative Samuel Alito to replace Sandra Day O'Connor. This has caused a certain consternation among people we affectionately term 'the left.' I can understand that sinking feeling. Even listening to pieces of Roberts's confirmation hearings was enough to induce despair: the joking with the candidate, the obvious signs that, whether Democrats or Republicans, these are all members of the same exclusive club."

Downfall

By Howard Zinn. Article. ZCommunications. August 18, 2000.
I am surprised that my friend Hans Koning, a stalwart protester against the war in Vietnam, seems to have been taken in by the argument of Richard Frank, in his review of Frank's Downfall. Yes, we must all be willing to reconsider our most hardened judgements in the light of new evidence. But there is nothing in Frank's argument -- however assiduous his research -- to make those of us who see the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as an unspeakable atrocity change our minds.

Duty of Expression

Howard Zinn interviewed by Sarah Burton. Resonance Magazine. November 2003.
Howard Zinn and Thom Yorke have never done lunch, waved to each other along a red carpet, or even met face to face. So we arranged the next best thing: a debate between these luminaries moderated via phone and email.… Each had plenty to say about art and politics, but not without also covering everything from Marx and Picasso to Donna Summer and Public Enemy.

Dying for the Government

Article by Howard Zinn. The Progressive. June 2004.
"Our government has declared a military victory in Iraq. As a patriot, I will not celebrate. I will mourn the dead — the American GIs, and also the Iraqi dead, of whom there have been many, many more. I will mourn the Iraqi children, not just those who are dead, but those who have been blinded, crippled, disfigured, or traumatized. We have not been given in the American media (we would need to read the foreign press) a full picture of the human suffering caused by our bombing. As a patriot, contemplating the dead GIs, I could comfort myself (as, understandably, their families do) with the thought: 'They died for their country.' But I would be lying to myself."

Election Madness

Article by Howard Zinn. The Progressive. March 2008.
"The very people who should know better, having criticized the hold of the media on the national mind, find themselves transfixed by the press, glued to the television set, as the candidates preen and smile and bring forth a shower of clichés with a solemnity appropriate for epic poetry.There’s a man in Florida who has been writing to me for years (ten pages, handwritten) though I’ve never met him. He tells me the kinds of jobs he has held—security guard, repairman, etc. He has worked all kinds of shifts, night and day, to barely keep his family going. His letters to me have always been angry, railing against our capitalist system for its failure to assure 'life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness' for working people."
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