Magazine or Newspaper

Rise Like Lions: The Role Of Artists In a Time Of War

Howard Zinn interviewed by David Barsamian. The Sun. July 2004.
Barsamian: You have called attention to the role of artists in a time of war. What attracts you to artists?
Zinn: Artists play a special role in social change. I first noticed this when I was a teenager and becoming politically aware for the first time. It was people in the arts who had the greatest emotional effect on me.

Robert Birnbaum Talks with the Author of A People’s History of the United States

Howard Zinn interviewed by Robert Birnbau. IdentityTheory.com . January 10, 2001.
"I talk to audiences in Oklahoma and Texas and here and there and mostly to audiences of people who don't really know my work. I certainly don't expect them to be sympathetic to my ideas. When I express my ideas — and they are radical ideas — except that I don't start off by saying, 'I'm now going to tell you radical ideas.' Or, 'I'm now going to expound ideas of socialism or attack capitalism. Or, 'This is going to be a hate imperialism talk.' None of that. People respond to common sense ideas about foreign policy and domestic policy. It encourages me about the potential in this country, despite who is running it."

Sacco and Vanzetti

By Howard Zinn. Article. The Progressive and ZCommunications. April 14, 2007 and March 11, 2009.
On that 50th year after the execution, the New York Times reported that: "Plans by Mayor Beame to proclaim next Tuesday "Sacco and Vanzetti Day’ have been canceled in an effort to avoid controversy, a City Hall spokesman said yesterday." There must be good reason why a case 50-years-old, now over 75-years-old, arouses such emotion. I suggest that it is because to talk about Sacco and Vanzetti inevitably brings up matters that trouble us today: our system of justice, the relationship between war fever and civil liberties, and most troubling of all, the ideas of anarchism: the obliteration of national boundaries and therefore of war, the elimination of poverty, and the creation of a full democracy.

Scare Words Leave Scars on Everyone

By Howard Zinn. Article. Newsday. January 22, 1989.
“The use of scare words is profoundly undemocratic. It stifles debate; it creates an atmosphere in which people are afraid to speak their minds, honestly, afraid to examine all ideas.”

Seattle

Article by Howard Zinn. ZCommunications, December 22, 1999, The Progressive as "A Flash of Possibility," January 2000.
"…it suggested…how apparently powerless people, if they unite in large numbers, can bring the machinery of government and commerce to a halt."

Secrecy, Archives, and the Public Interest

By Howard Zinn. Midwest Archives Conference/Archival Issues. July 1977.
This paper was presented at "The Archivist and the New Left" panel of the Society of American Archivists' (SAA) annual conference held in Washington, D.C. in which he urged archivists “to take the trouble to compile a whole new world of documentary material, about the lives, desires, needs, of ordinary people.”

Sender Garlin

Article by Howard Zinn. ZCommunications. March 2000. Also in The Progressive as "One Radical Who Did It All," April 2000.
"As the twentieth century came to an end last December, an extraordinary man, whose life spanned the century, died at the age of ninety-seven. His name was Sender Garlin. I first met Sender, ten years before his death, when he was only eighty-seven years old. It was the fall of 1989, and I had traveled to Boulder to give a talk at the University of Colorado. One of the chief organizers of my stay was a man named Sender Garlin, a longtime radical journalist and pamphleteer. I did not know him, and so I was not prepared for the excitement of my encounter with him."
SNCC Worker Briefing, Fall 1963 | HowardZinn.org

SNCC: The Battle-Scarred Youngsters

By Howard Zinn. Article. The Nation, October 5, 1963 and republished April 23, 2009.
Howard Zinn wrote about SNCC’s participation at the 1963 March on Washington. “. . . the youngest speaker on the platform, John Lewis...lashed out in anger, not only at the Dixiecrats, but at the Kennedy Administration, which had been successful up to that moment in directing the indignation of 200,000 people at everyone but itself.”

Society’s Best Students

Letter to the Editor by Howard Zinn and Chandler Davis. The Nation. September 7, 1970.
A letter about the Marian Davis Scholarship fund that helps socially concerned students.
blue scroll button with white arrow