Accessible at HowardZinn.org

screenshot of studio interview

History Detectives: Howard Zinn on the Lawrence Textile Strike

Howard Zinn interviewed by Elyse Luray. PBS History Detectives. 2006.
Elyse Luray: So why was there this renewed interest in the strike?
Howard Zinn: I think that the movements of the 1960s, of Black people in the South, of women, of people all over the country working against the war in Vietnam, of disabled people, there arose out of those movements, a greater interest in history that had been neglected in the orthodox teachings of the past. I think as part of that new interest in people's history, we began to get more interest in labor history, and therefore in the history of the Lawrence Strike.

History of America

Howard Zinn in discussion with Walter Mosley. BookTV. July 21, 2007.
At the 9th Annual Harlem Book Fair in the Schomburg Center’s Langston Hughes Auditorium, Howard Zinn and Walter Mosley talked about the history of America. Topics included politics, power, wealth and poverty, democracy, and the war in Iraq.

Howard Zinn Interview in The F-Word

Howard Zinn interviewed by Melody Berger • The F-Word Zine/PM Press • 2008
Howard Zinn discusses civil disobedience, outlaws versus criminals, social movements, labor organizing, and hope.

In Depth with Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn interviewed by Steve Scully. BookTV. Sept. 1, 2002.
On Sept. 1, 2002, Professor Zinn talked about his writings and career, and he responded to calls from viewers during the course of the program. Interviewed by Steve Scully.

My Grades Will Not Be Instruments of War

Letter by Howard Zinn. Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University.
In an undated letter (probably in 1966), Zinn said that he would not allow the grades he gave to play a role in helping the United States wage immoral wars. He announced that for students with a moral opposition to the war...

Obituaries and Tributes

A collection of obituaries and the numerous tributes made to Howard Zinn and his impact across generations and populations of people.
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