Accessible at HowardZinn.org

Scare Words Leave Scars on Everyone

By Howard Zinn. Article. Newsday. January 22, 1989.
“The use of scare words is profoundly undemocratic. It stifles debate; it creates an atmosphere in which people are afraid to speak their minds, honestly, afraid to examine all ideas.”

Secrecy, Archives, and the Public Interest

By Howard Zinn. Midwest Archives Conference/Archival Issues. July 1977.
This paper was presented at "The Archivist and the New Left" panel of the Society of American Archivists' (SAA) annual conference held in Washington, D.C. in which he urged archivists “to take the trouble to compile a whole new world of documentary material, about the lives, desires, needs, of ordinary people.”

Situation in Iraq

Interview with Howard Zinn. BookTV. Jan. 14, 2005.
On the Jan.14, 2005 episode of "Washington Journal," Mr. Zinn talked by video uplink from Boston about his views on the war in Iraq, politics and other topics in the news.

The First Amendment and A Free People Radio Show

Howard Zinn interviewed by Bernard Rubin. WBGH Boston Open Vault. 1970s.
Bernard Rubin: What’s your definition of radical?
Howard Zinn: Somebody who wants to do something to make very fundamental changes in the distribution of wealth, in the distribution of political power, and in a kind of culture of violence and oppression in which we exist today. Race, sex, class oppression, something that fundamental. That’s what I mean, I guess.

The Just War

Talks by Howard Zinn and Italian surgeon Dr. Gino Strada. BookTV. May 12, 2006.
On May 12,2006, American historian and activist Howard Zinn and Italian surgeon and author Dr. Gino Strada presented a forum on the theme “The Just War” held at the Immanuel Presbyterian Church.

Veterans Day

By Howard Zinn. Article. ZCommunications. November 13, 2002.
It would be good to remember a few things about that war as this country is about to embark on still another war. First, that you don’t "win" wars. We "won" World War I, but sowed the seeds of another world war. War is a quick fix, like crack. An exultant high — we won! — and soon you’re down again, and you need another fix, another war.

War Talk

Talks by Arundhati Roy and Howard Zinn. BookTV. May 13, 2003.
On May 13, 2003, Arundhati Roy talked about her book War Talk, published by South End Press, and discusses the war in Iraq, the Bush administration, and other issues with historian Howard Zinn.

Whom Will We Honor Memorial Day?

By Howard Zinn. Article. Boston Globe. June 2, 1976.
Memorial Day will be celebrated as usual, by high-speed collisions of automobiles and bodies strewn on highways and the sound of ambulance sirens throughout the land. It will also be celebrated by the display of flags, the sound of bugles and drums, by parades and speeches and unthinking applause. It will be celebrated by giant corporations, which make guns, bombs, fighter planes, aircraft carriers and an endless assortment of military junk and which await the $100 billion in contracts to be approved soon by Congress and the President. There was a young woman in New Hampshire who refused to allow her husband, killed in Vietnam, to be given a military burial. She rejected the hollow ceremony ordered by those who sent him and 50,000 others to their deaths. Her courage should be cherished on Memorial Day.
CIA protesters with banner, By Charles Carroll, April 1987 | HowardZinn.org

Zinn Testifies at the Trial of CIA Protesters

Testimony by Howard Zinn. From Trial of CIA Protesters, 1987.
On Nov. 25, 1986, 60 people—including Amy Carter and Abbie Hoffman—were arraigned on charges of disorderly conduct stemming from a sit-in to block CIA campus recruiting at University of Massachusetts-Amherst, an act of protest of the CIA's role in Central America. Howard Zinn testified as an expert on civil disobedience.

“Fellow Workers” Liner Notes by Howard Zinn

By Howard Zinn. Liner Notes to "Fellow Workers" album by Ani DiFranco and Utah Phillips. May 1, 1999.
Before I became a college professor I was a shipyard worker. Before I was a writer I was a warehouse worker. But whatever I did, I was always a member of a labor union. I think the only job I had where I couldn’t join a union was when I was a bombardier in the Air Force — and it might have been a good thing if we had one — maybe we would have gotten together and asked the question: Why are we dropping bombs on this peaceful village this morning?
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