Justice in Everyday Life: The Way It Really Works


Justice in Everyday Life: The Way It Really Works — This book explores the reality of justice, which has always stood in contrast to the rhetoric about equal rights under the law. With sections on the police, the courts, prisons, housing, work, health, schools, and popular struggle, Justice in Everyday Life features classic essays by a diverse group of authors. [Publisher’s description.]

Published by Morrow Books, 1974; Beacon Press, 1977; South End Press, 2002; Haymarket Books, 2013.

Previous Editions

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

Introduction: Justice in Everyday Life • p. ix

One: POLICE • p. 1
    • Justifiable Homicide: Due Process for Franklin Lynch • p. 3
    • Hemenway Street with Mark Stern • p. 11
    • The Police and Johnny K. by Johnny K. • p. 21
    • George Enos and the Baby Carriage with Dennis Blake and Domenic Restuccia • p. 30
    • The Complaint of Jamie Wickens by Jamie Wickens • p. 41
    • Triple Jeopardy • p. 59
    • Aberration — or Pattern? • p. 63
    • Solutions • p. 73

 

Two: COURTS 75
    • Elijah Adlow’s Court with Arthur J. Kaufman, Deborah Goldstein, Frederick Hayes, Connie Galanis, Alan Bauer, David Sobel, Arthur Werner, Mark Edell, Susan Shalhoub, Judi Kaye, Thomas Kouba, Richard Wayne, Joanne Taube, Patricia Endel, John Racicot, Carolyn Jacoby, John Carli, Joyce Harding • p. 77
    • Gideon’s Trumpet and the Mass Defenders by Paul Kaplan • p. 92
    • The Rendition of Malik Hakim • p. 100
    • A Jury of One’s Peers • p. 107
    • The Unimportant Case: Jose Gonzales by John Flym • p. 110
    • A “Prostitute” in Morrisey’s Court by Anne Wilson • p. 117
    • Commonwealth v. Jones: The Case of Pepe by Phyllis Kachinsky • p. 126
    • Solutions • p. 138

 

Three: PRISONS • p. 141
    • Punishment • p. 143
    • Charles Street Jail • p. 155
    • Walpole • p. 163
    • Journal from Hell — Jimmy Barrett’s Diary in the DSU — Bridgewater • p. 173
    • Solutions • p. 190

 

Four: HOUSING • p. 193
    • Justice Is Having a Decent Place to Live with Thomas G. Leahy, Mark Stern, Merle Berke, Janice Marin, Merrie Mitchell, Jordan Stitzer, Joseph Caruso, Ned Epstein • p. 195
    • The Eviction of Peter and Catherine Hannon by Timothy McMahon • p. 207

 

Five: WORK • p. 215
    • Injustice at Work • p. 217

 

Six: HEALTH • p. 231
    • Two-Class Health Care in the Boston Ghetto by Jonathan Kozol • p. 233
    • Mental Institutions for the Poor • p. 251
    • Mental Institutions for the Well-Off by Margaret Kiphuth • p. 259
    • A Postscript by Douglas Segal • p. 271

 

Seven: SCHOOLS • p. 273
    • All Schools Are Prep Schools • p. 275
    • Sexual Tracking and Other School Tricks by Adria Reich • p. 283
    • The Wellesley Incident by Joan M. Carrigan • p.291
    • A Black Student Sits in the Assembly While the Mayor Speaks (“If You’re Black, There’s No Explanation”) by Richard Wornum • p. 309

 

Eight: FIGHTING BACK • p. 319
    • “The People First” versus Judge Troy by Shamus Glynn • p. 321
    • Tenants Organizing by Mark Stern and Joseph Cirincione • p. 334
    • Winning Back Jobs at Boston State by Henry Allen (with Charles Shively) • p. 345
    • Conclusion: Fighting Back • p. 353