2001

Antiwar Protest, Sept. 15, 2007 • WikiCommons

A Just Cause, Not a Just War

By Howard Zinn. Article. The Progressive. December 2001.
I believe two moral judgments can be made about the present "war": The September 11 attack constitutes a crime against humanity and cannot be justified, and the bombing of Afghanistan is also a crime, which cannot be justified. And yet, voices across the political spectrum, including many on the left, have described this as a "just war."

Afghanistan, U.S. Wars Gone By, and the Prospects for a Humane U.S. Foreign Policy

Talk by Howard Zinn. Democracy Now! October 22, 2001.
Protests against the U.S. and British attacks against Afghanistan continued around the world—from Belgium to Greece to London, Spain, Thailand, and Indonesia. In Burlington, Vermont this Sunday historian and activist Howard Zinn spoke to more than 1,000 people about the current U.S. war on Afghanistan in the context of previous interventions and the prospects for peace and a humane foreign policy.
book cover

Howard Zinn on History

By Howard Zinn. Book - Essays. Seven Stories Press. 2001; updated 2013 with an introduction by Staughton Lynd.
A collection of 27 writings on activism, electoral politics, the Holocaust, Marxism, the Iraq War, and the role of the historian.
book cover

Howard Zinn on War

By Howard Zinn. Book - Essays. Seven Stories Press, 2001; updated 2013. Introduction by Marilyn B. Young.
Essays spanning 1962 to 2006 that examine specific wars, wartime incidents, and the force of non-violence to move beyond war, if we are to survive.

Manning Marable, Howard Zinn and Grace Paley Speak Out Against the March to War

Manning Marable, Howard Zinn, and Grace Paley interviewed by Amy Goodman. Democracy Now! September 13, 2001.
"Why can’t we take our cue from the rescue workers, from the compassion shown by the medical teams, the doctors and nurses and medical students, the firemen and policemen, whose thought—when they are taking care of these people and trying to find people and help them and cure them, their thought is not of retaliation. No, their thought is of human compassion and how to end the suffering."

McVeigh’s Path to the Death Chamber

By Howard Zinn. Article. Boston Globe. June 16, 2001.
Now that Timothy McVeigh has been put to death, and some people's need for revenge or punishment may be satisfied, we can begin to think calmly of how he learned his twisted sense of right and wrong from the government that executed him.

Radical History: A Conversation with Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn interviewed by Harry Kreisler. Conversations with History. April 20, 2001.
KREISLER: Let's talk a little about your youth first and then talk about the other things. How specifically do you think your parents shaped your character?
ZINN: The only influence that had in my life was my observation of their lives. My observation that my father was working very hard, of honest hardworking men. My mother working very hard, raising four sons and yet, of course, they had nothing to show for it. That is, they were perfect counterpoints to the Horatio Alger myth that if you work hard in this country you will get somewhere. And I think that that intensified my feeling about the injustice of an economic system in which there are people all over the country like my parents who worked very, very hard had nothing to show for it.
blue scroll button with white arrow