Articles & Interviews

The First Amendment and A Free People Radio Show

Source: WBGH Boston Open Vault • 1970s
Bernard Rubin: What’s your definition of radical?
Howard Zinn: Somebody who wants to do something to make very fundamental changes in the distribution of wealth, in the distribution of political power, and in a kind of culture of violence and oppression in which we exist today. Race, sex, class oppression, something that fundamental. That’s what I mean, I guess.

History Detectives: Howard Zinn on the Lawrence Textile Strike

screenshot of studio interview
Source: PBS History Detectives • 2006
Elyse Luray: So why was there this renewed interest in the strike?
Howard Zinn: I think that the movements of the 1960s, of Black people in the South, of women, of people all over the country working against the war in Vietnam, of disabled people, there arose out of those movements, a greater interest in history that had been neglected in the orthodox teachings of the past. I think as part of that new interest in people's history, we began to get more interest in labor history, and therefore in the history of the Lawrence Strike.

SNCC: The Battle-Scarred Youngsters

SNCC Worker Briefing, Fall 1963 | HowardZinn.org This year is the 60th anniversary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Howard Zinn wrote about SNCC’s participation at the 1963 March on Washington. “...the youngest speaker on the platform, John Lewis...lashed out in anger, not only at the Dixiecrats, but at the Kennedy Administration, which had been successful up to that moment in directing the indignation of 200,000 people at everyone but itself.”

My Grades Will Not Be Instruments of War

Source: Howard Zinn Papers, Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University
In an undated letter (probably in 1966), Zinn said that he would not allow the grades he gave to play a role in helping the United States wage immoral wars. He announced that for students with a moral opposition to the war...

New Book Featuring Howard Zinn: Truth Has a Power of Its Own

Banner to promote new book Truth Has a Power of Its Own: Conversations About A People’s History is a collection of never-before-published conversations with Howard Zinn, conducted by the distinguished broadcast journalist Ray Suarez in 2007. Suarez’s probing questions and Zinn’s humane (and often humorous) voice—along with his keen moral vision—shine through every one of these lively and thought-provoking conversations, showing that Zinn’s work is as relevant as ever.

History Distorted: Sam Wineburg’s Critique of Howard Zinn

By David Detmer One of Howard Zinn’s harshest, and most influential, critics is Sam Wineburg, the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education at Stanford University, and Director of the Stanford History Education Group. In the Winter 2012-2013 issue of American Educator, Professor Wineburg published an eight-page essay entitled “Undue Certainty: Where Howard Zinn’s A People’s History Falls Short.” My new book, Zinnophobia: The Battle over History in Education, Politics, and Scholarship (Zero Books, 2018), contains a lengthy, point-by-point rebuttal to the criticisms he advances in that essay.

A People’s History: “You Didn’t Get Assigned in School But Definitely Need to Read”

Bustle: 15 History Books You Didn't Get Assigned In School But Definitely Need To Read | HowardZinn.org Bustle.com • Sept. 22, 2017
Right now all around the country, Confederate statues are being taken down, and the issue has the nation divided. On one side, Americans are ready to let go of memorials that glorify the leaders who fought to preserve slavery and promote racial discrimination, and on the other, people are claiming the removal of these monuments is an erasure of history. For those people who are worried that this country's narrative won't survive taking down these painful reminders of hatred, racism, and bigotry, these essential history books you didn't read in school will fill in all those gaps and more.