1999

‘Inspire Please…’

By Howard Zinn. ZCommunications. July 16, 1999. The Progressive, September 1999,  as "Words in Encouragement."
"For those not in the know, let me explain that we who write for the progressive-radical movement have our specialties. Some specialize in writing depressing stuff. Others write humorous pieces. Some concentrate on trashing other Left writers. It seems that there was an opening this month for someone to inspire, and I was chosen. Not an easy job, when the United States government has just finished dropping thousands of cluster bombs on Yugoslavia…"

A Diplomatic Solution

Article by Howard Zinn. The Progressive. May 1999.
"A friend wrote to ask my opinion on Kosovo. He said many people were turning to him for answers, and he didn't know what to say, so he was turning to me (knowing, I guess, that I always have something to say, right or wrong). Several things seem clear to me, and they don't fit easily together in a way that points to a clean solution."

A Larger Consciousness

By Howard Zinn. Article. ZCommunications. December 22, 1999. The Progressive, November 1999 as "Respecting the Holocaust."
"Some years ago, when I was teaching at Boston University, I was asked by a Jewish group to give a talk on the Holocaust. I spoke that evening, but not about the Holocaust of World War II, not about the genocide of six million Jews. It was the mid-Eighties, and the United States government was supporting death squad governments in Central America, so I spoke of the deaths of hundreds of thousands of peasants in Guatemala and El Salvador, victims of American policy. My point was that the memory of the Jewish Holocaust should not be encircled by barbed wire, morally ghettoized, kept isolated from other genocides in history."

American History Review of the 20th Century: Manning Marable and Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn interviewed by Amy Goodman. Democracy Now! December 27, 1999.
"But what the history of this country shows, and especially in this century, is that democracy comes alive when people who see that the formal structure of government doesn’t help them. The formal structure of government does not change the 12-hour day, doesn’t change the conditions of work, doesn’t change the power of the corporations over working people. When people see that that formal structure doesn’t work, then they organize. They go out on strike. They demonstrate."

Beyond the Soviet Union

By Howard Zinn. Article. ZCommunications. December 22, 1999.
I offer as my Commentary a response I just made to a letter by a retired professor in California, who wrote: “As a great admirer of Howard Zinn, I was profoundly disappointed by some of his comments made during his interview with David Barsamian in the March issue of Z Magazine.” Without reproducing my correspondent's letter I think the gist of his comments are clear from my responses. Fundamentally, he did not like my saying I was “very glad” the rule of the Soviet government ended. He took issue with my skepticism about violent revolutions. He made interesting, provocative, thoughtful arguments.

Big Goverment for Whom?

Article by Howard Zinn. The Progressive. April 1999.
"I have seen some of my most stalwart friends flinch before the accusation that they—in asking, let us say, for a single-payer health care system—were calling for 'big government.' So insistent has been the press and the political leadership of the country—in both parties—that 'big government' is a plague to be avoided, that otherwise courageous people on the left have retreated before the attached. It’s an issue, therefore, that deserves some examination."
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