From the Archives

Ends and Means: History and Consequences of Anti-Communism

Institute for Media Analysis and DeeDee Halleck • 1988
Howard Zinn discusses how the word communism (and Marxism) is used to obscure people’s attention, scapegoat people and movements, and how he prefers to get to the essence of where people stand on issues rather than using labels. Zinn heralds radicals as people we need to help achieve a more just world.

The Myth of American Exceptionalism • Howard Zinn at MIT

Source: MIT Video Productions • 2005
Howard Zinn gave an account of American imperialism spanning the last hundred years noting tactics that the U.S. uses, such as extraordinary rendition and shared the various reasons the U.S. goes to war. He ended on a note of hope, reminding us of all of the great social movements this country has had and will likely have again.

A People’s History of American Empire • Talks at Google

Source: Talks at Google • 2008
The Authors@Google program welcomed Howard Zinn to Google's Cambridge office on November 11, 2008. Professor Howard Zinn discusses the role of U.S. Empire and how militarism and U.S. interventionism comes at a cost of harming the people in the U.S., as well as the harm done to other countries.

Shall the House Committee on Un-American Activities Be Abolished?

Source: Howard Zinn Papers, Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University • 1963
On February 11, 1963, at Emory University, Howard Zinn participated in a debate with Fulton Lewis III, a journalist and member of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) on whether HUAC should be abolished. Zinn noted this in his diary and the two-and-half hour event was recorded.

The First Amendment and A Free People Radio Show

Source: WBGH Boston Open Vault • 1970s
Bernard Rubin: What’s your definition of radical?
Howard Zinn: Somebody who wants to do something to make very fundamental changes in the distribution of wealth, in the distribution of political power, and in a kind of culture of violence and oppression in which we exist today. Race, sex, class oppression, something that fundamental. That’s what I mean, I guess.

History Detectives: Howard Zinn on the Lawrence Textile Strike

screenshot of studio interview
Source: PBS History Detectives • 2006
Elyse Luray: So why was there this renewed interest in the strike?
Howard Zinn: I think that the movements of the 1960s, of Black people in the South, of women, of people all over the country working against the war in Vietnam, of disabled people, there arose out of those movements, a greater interest in history that had been neglected in the orthodox teachings of the past. I think as part of that new interest in people's history, we began to get more interest in labor history, and therefore in the history of the Lawrence Strike.

My Grades Will Not Be Instruments of War

Source: Howard Zinn Papers, Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University
In an undated letter (probably in 1966), Zinn said that he would not allow the grades he gave to play a role in helping the United States wage immoral wars. He announced that for students with a moral opposition to the war...

Ella Baker: “One of the most consequential and yet one of the least honored people in America”

Source: American Radio Works
On April 24, 1968, Howard Zinn introduced organizer Ella Baker at a dinner honoring her work. Zinn described Baker as "one of the most consequential and yet one of the least honored people in America."